News from around the world to fuel our prayers


News in brief - February issue

News in brief – February issue

Here are a handful of news-bites included in the February issue of en to help us in remembering our brothers and sisters around the world. Please use these articles to spur your prayers, personally or in regular prayer meetings, as we pray for persecuted Christians worldwide.

Egypt: Still held
Iran: Released
Kenya: Saved by Mulsims
Sudan: Acquitted
USA: Waiver

For more news and prayer fuel from around world and in the UK visit our website or subscribe to en for monthly updates.

News in the UK to fuel our prayers


News in brief - February issue

News in brief – February issue

Here are a handful of news-bites included in the February issue of en. Please use these articles to spur your prayers, personally or in regular prayer meetings, as we pray for our country.

Christians unacceptable
Ramadan and exams
Unlikely alliance
Barnabas appointments
Pastor not guilty
Enforced equality
More than 100MP’s

For more news and prayer fuel from around world and in the UK visit our website or subscribe to en for monthly updates.

Revival in Ethiopia…(February issue highlights)


Out now in the FEBRUARY 2016 issue of Evangelicals Now…

Cover page February issue Evangelicals Now

Cover page February issue Evangelicals Now

• Over recent years 70,000 people have come to Christ in Ethiopia

• Churches help victims of the unprecedented flooding in the UK

• New research investigating the joys and challenges of single Christian women working for churches

The February 2016 issue is out now! Read it online or enjoy the printed paper with your morning cuppa!

You may subscribe to have regular access every month to all of the articles. Don’t miss out – subscribe here today!

Why society is on the slide


Edward Vines exposes the historical roots of the cultural shift in the Western world

Presidents Washington, Jefferson, T. Roosevelt & Lincoln at Mount Rushmore |photo: iStock

Presidents Washington, Jefferson, T. Roosevelt & Lincoln at Mount Rushmore | photo: iStock

In 1776 the group of men who would become known as America’s founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence.

Thereby they informed King George that the American colonies would no longer subject themselves to the rule of the British Crown. At the close of the American Revolution, many of these same statesmen set about to design a government which was so unique in history that it has been called the Great American Experiment.

Overwhelmingly Christian

In order to fully understand the principles that underpin our founding documents and the philosophies that have led our nation to such incredible success, you must understand a few things about the authors. First, they were overwhelmingly Christian. Nearly all 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence were members of a recognised Christian denomination. Even such figures as Jefferson, Franklin and Madison, whose religious beliefs were rather unorthodox, had all attended the Episcopal Church at various times in their lives and all spoke favourably of the moral teachings of Jesus.

While today’s landscape abounds with historical revisionists who claim that the founders were indifferent to religion and were committed to creating a purely secular society, it is hard to explain away quotes from early American statesmen such as:.…(to read more click here)

The Honourable Edward B. Vines is a district judge in Jefferson County, Alabama, who hears domestic relations cases. He is a practicing Christian and an active member of Shades Crest Baptist Church, a Southern Baptist congregation in Hoover, Alabama.

This article was first published in the October issue of Evangelicals Now. For more news, articles or reviews, visit us online or subscribe to en for monthly updates.

Home service by Tim Thornborough: Sweating the hard stuff


photo: iStock

photo: iStock

We got around to 1 Timothy 2.8–15 at home group recently.

It was an educating experience for me as a leader. The passage has been a heated battleground for alternative interpretations over the last 30 years, so I was interested to discover how influenced my group members have been by these views, when our church’s preaching and practice has been uncompromisingly complementarian – women and men are equal, but have different roles.

Paul’s text says: ‘I desire then that in every place the men should pray, lifting holy hands without anger or quarrelling; likewise also that women should adorn themselves in respectable apparel, with modesty and self-control, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly attire, but with what is proper for women who profess godliness – with good works. Let a woman learn quietly with all submissiveness. I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man; rather, she is to remain quiet. For Adam was formed first, then Eve; and Adam was not deceived, but the woman was deceived and became a transgressor. Yet she will be saved through childbearing – if they continue in faith and love and holiness, with self-control.’

Confusing discussion

We had a great time talking about how men should pray, not fight. We had a good discussion about the particular issues the women in the group faced on the clothing v godliness issue. I spent a long time on these two questions, secretly hoping that the discussion over verses 11–15 would be squeezed a little shorter….(to read more click here)

Tim Thornborough is the Creative Director at the Good Book Company.

This article was first published in the October 2015 issue of Evangelicals Now. For more news, articles or reviews, visit us online or subscribe to en for monthly updates.

Facing a gunman (book review)


Prepared for a purposePREPARED FOR A PURPOSE
By
Antoinette Tuff with Alex Tresniowski
Bethany House Publishers. 232 pages. £9.99
ISBN 978 0 764 212 635

How do you prepare for a crisis? Can you ever be mentally, physically and spiritually ready if a disaster, or another devastation, occurred to you or to those you care for? In the material comfort of our Western culture we can be lulled into a false sense of security. How then can we prepare ourselves so that we are ready when the need arises?

Prepared for a Purpose relates the story of Antoinette Tuff, who found herself on 20 August 2013 as the last line of defence between 840 school children and a masked gunman in a school in Georgia…. (to read more click here)

Amy Adcock
Christian, wife, mum, pastor’s wife,
Great Whyte Baptist Church, Ramsey, Cambridgeshire

This article was first published in the October 2015 issue of Evangelicals Now. For more news, articles or reviews, visit our website or subscribe to en for regular updates.

‘I always want to win’


Graham Hooper asks if Christians should be competitive

photo: iStock

photo: iStock

‘The trouble with the rat race is that even when you win you’re still a rat.’ (Lily Tomlin)

Is competition God-given, and therefore fundamentally good? Or is it a result of the fall and therefore fundamentally bad. Or is it somewhere in-between? To what extent are you motivated by your competitive instincts in your workplace?

Like ambition, competitiveness can be a very positive Christian quality when it channels the drive to fulfil our God-given potential to be creative, to serve, to step out in faith. It can also be very bad when it leads to self-obsession, self-aggrandisement and self-promotion.

I have never heard a sermon or talk in a Christian context about competition. Maybe I have missed out somewhere. Maybe competition is not something Christians think they need to talk about, or want to talk about, in a church setting. I suspect it’s the latter.… (to read more click here)

Graham Hooper is an independent consultant and author of Undivided – closing the faith life gap, IVP 2013. He contributes regularly to the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity, to Malyon Work and the Melbourne City Bible Forum.

This article was first published in the October issue of Evangelicals Now. For more news, articles or reviews, visit us online or subscribe to en for monthly updates.