Tub-thumping Praise!


MY SOUL WILL WAIT (Psalm 62)
from the album Unchanging God: songs from
the book of Psalms
by Sovereign Grace Music

It seems as though our culture has no shortage of things to protest about, be it the disaster of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Black Lives Matter, Covid-19… the list could go on.

But if you call yourself a Christian, you are, in a sense, a member of perhaps the longest-standing protest movement in human history. And where other movements have sung We Shall Overcome or Give Peace a Chance, we have sung the Psalms.

My Soul Will Wait, the leading release from Sovereign Grace’s 2022 album Unchanging God: songs from the book of Psalms, is inspired by Psalm 62. In this psalm, David sings to his attackers in open defiance, filled with an irrepressible trust in God. While this song is by no means a perfect paraphrase, writers Keaton Bunting and Bob Kauflin have really captured David’s spirit, both in their lyrical content, managing to be confident without being superficially triumphalist, and also in their musical setting, which features a tub-thumping chorus which you can easily imagine a football-esque crowd tanking out at the top of their lungs.

Protest songs

The church this side of heaven has always needed protest songs. We join with the Protestant Huguenots riling up the French authorities by singing metrical psalms in prison, or crowds of thousands singing psalms at St Paul’s Cross in London in the turmoil of the English Reformation, or Paul and Silas singing hymns (most likely psalms) in the Philippian jail (see Acts 16).

We protest the narrative that the church of Christ is doomed to obscurity; we protest the narrative that death is the end and that all prior suffering is meaningless; we protest the idea that the only people who matter are those who hold the reins of power. The church needs more protest songs. I pray that Sovereign Grace’s latest offering might unite your voices and stir your hearts.

Matt MacGregor

Matt MacGregor is the director of music at St Andrew the Great Church, Cambridge.