Algeria: God has raised up His church


photo: iStock

 

‘God is enlarging our dream.’

Showing us the door


image : saamvisual.com

 

In the run-up to the snap General Election, called by Theresa May for 8 June, Rico Tice was interviewed for Radio 4’s Today regarding the issue. If Christians are seen as inherently unfit for public office because of their beliefs, it would effectively mean that we are excluded from the ‘inclusive’ society.

Don’t express beliefs…


Sarah Kuteh

 

“You can’t know in advance whether someone would be offended by a comment.”

Cave time


Chris Sinkinson with the grandson of Kando, the dealer who brought the Dead Sea Scrolls to light, and one of the few original Dead Sea Scroll jars.

 

February 2017 saw the announcement across all news media of the discovery of a new Dead Sea Scrolls cave…

Question of evil


 

This latest contribution to the beautifully designed, multi-coloured, logo-embossed ‘Questions Christians Ask’ series tackles a question that is undeniably relevant. Confronted by events in the wider world, and rocked by tragedies in our own lives, we are all tempted at times to doubt that God really is in control. This book reassures us that he is sovereign and good, and helps us understand how that can be in the face of so much suffering.

Beauty from brokenness


Emotions at the wedding

Emotions at the wedding

 

One of the two sisters brutally gang-raped by three young Muslim men at gunpoint in Jaranwala, Pakistan, during November 2014, was married to a loving Christian husband on 20 December 2016.

Christianity without apology?


Kevin DeYoung

Kevin DeYoung

 

Kevin DeYoung asks if it is biblical for Christians to defend their rights…

Serving as a single woman


Rebecca and Eleanor investigate the joys and challenges of the unmarried Christian worker

photo: iStock

photo: iStock

Biblical Christianity values singleness like no other world religion.

It is a prized and precious gift, an encouraged option for a fulfilled life of service. Yet many Christian singles struggle with this ‘gift’. A huge proportion – our estimate is more than half – of women in full-time ministry are single1. We conducted interviews with over 50 people 2 in order to investigate the challenges and blessings for single women working in UK churches, para-church organisations and on the mission field, with the aim of encouraging and affirming them and better equipping those working alongside them.

We will report our findings in a series of three en articles. Here, in the first, we share our summary observations.

Unique ministry

Our respondents were eager to talk of the privilege and joy of serving the Lord. They felt that their singleness forced them to rely on God in deeper ways than colleagues with a spouse to talk to, and several spoke of the sweetness of uttering their first and last words of the day to Jesus. They rejoiced in the.…(to read more click here)

This article was first published in the February issue of Evangelicals Now. For more news, articles or reviews, visit us online or subscribe to en for monthly updates.

Rear view mirror by Michael Haykin: Are you a good historian?


Caleb Evans

Caleb Evans

Every Christian ought to be an informed historian.

Though it was written 200 years ago, Jane Austen’s fiction is still popular, since so much of it still rings true to human experience. In her novel Northanger Abbey (1817), for instance, the heroine Catherine Morland makes a statement that is amazingly prescient about the modern boredom with history.

In Catherine’s words, history ‘tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars or pestilences, in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all – it is very tiresome’. Many in the modern world, sadly even Christians, see the past as little more than this: a tiresome account of a few big names with little wisdom to impart for life today. At best, it may offer a couple of hours of entertainment and diversion via a movie or a novel….(to read more click here)

Michael Haykin is Professor of Church History and Biblical Spirituality at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.

This article was first published in the January 2016 issue of Evangelicals Now. For more news, articles or reviews, visit us online or subscribe to en for monthly updates.

The working class and Christ


David Binder interviews SixtyEightFive founder, Ian Williamson.

Ian Williamson

Ian Williamson

Many have argued that the evangelical church in the UK has been largely dominated by the middle class.

More should be done to reach those in poorer, working-class areas. Christ’s Great Commission demands it.

One example of working-class gospel ministry already taking place is through the charity Sixtyeightfive, founded by married father of two Ian Williamson. Working in some of the most deprived wards in the country, this ministry seeks to evangelise and disciple men and women in the North East England town of Middlesbrough who have been raised in a fatherless environment.

I caught up with Ian to chat more about his own testimony, the work of the charity and how it is reaching the working class for the gospel.

en: Tell us more about your personal connection with the issues the SixtyEightFive ministry engages with.
IW: I was raised in Middlesbrough by my mum, who was a lone parent. I longed to have my dad around and as such I suffered from fear, anger and found it difficult to understand what it means to be a man. I didn’t have anybody to tell me about cars, football, how to fix a puncture or to shave, for example!

My mum became a Christian when I was 14 and the family went to church with her.

The youth group at the church had an invisible but very noticeable divide between the estate kids and the church kids and I soon became dissatisfied and started knocking around with friends from school rather than the kids from the church.

Before I left the church at 16 I spent some time with a young man living on the estate who was also raised in a fatherless environment.… (to read more click here)

David Binder blogs at http://thoughtsofbinder.wordpress.com/

This article was first published in the December issue of Evangelicals Now. For more news, articles or reviews, visit us online or subscribe to en for monthly updates.