Prayer fuel: News in the UK


Prayer Fuel

Here are a handful of news-bites from around the UK included in the September issue of EN. May these spur us on to pray for our country and issues we all are facing.

 

Majority sidelined

 

Proposals to allow three-parent babies will be pushed forward by the government, despite more than 60% of people opposing the plans in a consultation, it was announced on July 22, as the responses to a 12-week government consultation were released.
Figures showed that, of 1,857 responses, 1,152 opposed the idea of three-parent babies, while 700 ‘expressed general support’. The remainder did not come down on either side. The Christian Institute

 

New for the Cornish

 

Cornwall now has the Bible online, it was reported in late July.
The New Testament and Psalms are available in Cornish as a downloadable app. Translators say it makes the Bible ‘really accessible’ for people, who can now get it on their smartphones. There are an estimated 500 fluent Cornish speakers and a further 3-4,000 who can hold a conversation in Cornish. Bible Society’s Newswatch

 

EA wins

 

The Evangelical Alliance’s complaint about an offensive advertisement by the gambling organisation Sporting Index, which was published in June by City AM newspaper, was upheld by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) in August.
The ruling, published on August 6 on their website, found that the June 10 advertisement, in which the Christ the Redeemer statue in Brazil was digitally altered, breached three sections of their code. The image of the statue was graphically altered and shown to be holding a bottle of booze in the right hand with the left arm around a bikini-clad model over the caption: ‘There’s a more exciting side to Brazil’. Evangelical Alliance

For more news and prayer fuel from around the UK, visit our website or subscribe to EN for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News from the UK and around the world


Prayer Fuel

(view original UK articles and WORLD articles here)

Here are a handful of news-bites from around the UK and around the world included in the August issue of EN. May these encourage us as well as spur us on to pray for our brothers and sisters around the world facing severe persecution.

 

Yes to life
In late June, the UK’s highest court dismissed an appeal to allow doctors to assist in suicides.

The case involved the family of Tony Nicklinson – who died in 2012 and could only communicate by blinking and nodding – and Paul Lamb, who is paralysed, and another man who wanted to travel abroad to die in a Dignitas clinic. Judges ruled 7-2 to reject their appeal, with Lord Sumption noting that legalising assisted suicide ‘would be followed by its progressive normalisation, among the very old or very ill’.
The Christian Institute

 

Disciplined by church?
It was announced at the end of June that the first Church of England clergyman to enter a same sex marriage has been told he can no longer conduct services.

Canon Jeremy Pemberton, a divorced father of five, and his partner Laurence Cunnington had a same sex wedding ceremony in April against official Church of England guidance. Canon Pemberton can no longer officiate at services in the Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham, but he continues to be a chaplain to hospitals in Lincoln.
The Christian Institute/Christian Concern

 

Safe abortions?
In response to a written parliamentary question in June, it was revealed that the number of women who have died within one month following a legal abortion has risen from just one woman in 1985, to 20 women in 2006-08.

Public Health Minister, Jane Ellison MP stated that the cause of death recorded on death certificates for women who died after an abortion is not reviewed by the Department of Health.
Right to Life Charitable Trust
(Editor – the abortion rate only rose from around 12 per thousand women in 1985 to around 17 in 2006-08. House of Commons Library.)

 

Canada: pronoun chaos
Teachers should replace he or she, him or her and his or hers with new pronouns xe, xem and xyr to refer to children who believe they are transsexual, according to school rules passed in Vancouver in late June.

The new words were sanctioned to be used as alternatives to regular pronouns if required by pupils. Training is also being backed for teachers to develop a ‘gay-friendly’ curriculum, and states that children ‘have the right to dress in a manner consistent with their gender identity or gender expression’.
The Christian Institute

N.Korea: tourists charged
North Korea is preparing to try two American tourists on charges of ‘perpetrating hostile acts’ against the country – one apparently because a Bible was left behind in his hotel room – it was reported in June.

North Korean state media said that one of the men entered the country in April with a tourist visa but tore it up at the airport, declaring that he wanted to seek asylum.
Bible Society’s Newswatch

USA: abortion bankrolled
The world’s fourth richest person, Warren Buffett, ploughed $1.23 billion into abortion groups over 11 years, it was reported in July.

The Media Research Center (MRC), which analysed tax returns for Buffett’s foundation, labelled him the ‘king of abortion’. Neither Buffett, nor the foundation at the centre of the controversy, have commented on the revelations. The money given ‘is enough to pay for the abortions of more than 2.7 million babies’.
The Christian Institute

For more news and prayer fuel from the UK and around the world visit our website or subscribe for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News from around the world


Prayer Fuel

Here are a handful of news-bites from around the world included in the July issue of EN. May these encourage us as well as spur us on to pray for our brothers and sisters around the world facing severe persecution.

Pakistan: call to protect

Pakistan’s National Assembly unanimously passed a resolution calling on the government to take steps to protect the worship places of the country’s religious minorities, it was reported in May.
The motion urges the deployment of special security personnel at sites located in ‘areas at risk of terrorist attacks’. Though non-binding, the resolution has symbolic significance as a statement of intent to protect Christians and other minorities, who are regularly targeted by Islamic extremists in Pakistan

Barnabas Fund

 

Palestine: stabbing

A Christian man was stabbed and around eight others injured in an attack on a church near Bethlehem in May.
Muslims interrupted a church service in the village of El-Khader in the West Bank, turning violent when they were asked to leave. They started throwing stones at the building, causing damage including broken windows. The incident comes amid increased attacks on churches in Israel; 14 have been reported in the past year, several of them in late Spring. Threats have also been made against senior church leaders.

Barnabas Fund

 

USA: prayer permitted

In early May, the US Supreme Court backed a town council’s freedom to pray at the beginning of its meetings after two local residents complained.
Judge Anthony Kennedy said the prayers do not exclude those with no religious faith and that judges should not rule on the content of prayer because it could lead to lawmakers censoring chaplains’ messages in order to make them ‘acceptable for the public square’.

The Christian Institute

 

For more news and prayer fuel from around the world, go to our website or subscribe to EN for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News in the UK


Prayer FuelHere are a handful of news-bites from around the UK included in the July issue of EN. May these spur us on to pray for our country and issues we all are facing.

Wrong or rights?

Children in Church of England schools could be given sex education materials provided by gay rights groups, according to new guidance launched by the Archbishop of Canterbury, it was reported in mid-May.
Critics have raised concerns that within the 72-page guidance, produced by the CofE, Stonewall is mentioned more than Jesus Christ. The guidance is entitled ‘Valuing All God’s Children’. The Archbishop said: ‘No sense of something being right or wrong justifies another wrong’.
The Christian Institute

Scotland: evangelism

Grace Edinburgh are thanking God for his help and favour during their week of evangelism during the Spring.
10,000 homes were reached in tract distribution. 600 gospels were distributed by hand. Hundreds of homes were visited and around 100 people had lengthy gospel conversations. Over 20 visitors came to church services and some have continued to stay in touch.
Grace Baptist Partnership Scotland

Resist assisted suicide

An online petition asking people to resist the legalisation of assisted suicide in the UK was launched in May by Not Dead Yet UK, a network of disabled people in the UK opposing the legalisation of assisted suicide and euthanasia.
Signing up to the online petition will help fight against Lord Falconer’s forthcoming Private Members Bill which Not Dead Yet fear will begin to open the door to state sanctioned assisted dying.
The Right to Life Charitable Trust

For more news and prayer fuel from around the UK, go to our website to subscribe to EN for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News from the UK and around the world


Prayer FuelHere are a handful of news-bites from around the UK and around the world included in the June issue of EN. May these encourage us as well as spur us on to pray for our brothers and sisters around the world facing severe persecution.

WEST by Northwest

WEST teamed up with the North West Partnership in April so that students will be able to study together for the Graduate Diploma and Masters-level degree programmes at the centre in Liverpool.

Jonathan Stephen, principal of WEST, said: ‘This is a highly significant development for WEST, as we continue to fulfil our commitment to “bringing the academy into missional church”’. WEST

Less protected

Christians are afforded less protection for their beliefs by the state compared to those who practise other religions, suggests a late April survey.

Of the 2000 people surveyed exclusively for The Telegraph, nearly half thought British believers had less protection. This figure rises to 62% among those who identify as non-practising Christians. The poll also reveals that 56% see Britain as a Christian country.
The Christian Institute

NI: rejecting SSM

The Northern Ireland Assembly rejected gay marriage by an outright majority for the third time on April 29.

Assembly members voted 51 to 43 against redefining marriage at Stormont. Pro-traditional marriage campaigners say those pushing for a change should ‘take the hint’. The private member’s motion in support of same sex marriage was tabled by six members from the Alliance, Sinn Fein and the Green parties, and called on the Minister of Finance and Personnel to introduce gay marriage legislation.
The Christian Institute

Australia: Christian

The April elected Premier of New South Wales, Liberal MP Mike Baird, is reported to be a committed Christian.

Baird, 46, was elected unopposed. He attends an Anglican church in his electorate of Manly (a beachside suburb of Sydney). Bruce Clark, senior minister at St Matthew’s on the Corso, said that Baird is a strongly committed Christian man.

Fellowship of European Broadcasters / Eternity Newspaper

Google: 0 results

Google has bowed to pressure from American ‘pro-choice’ group NARAL by agreeing to ban advertisements for crisis pregnancy centres that educate women on the alternative options to abortion, it was reported in early May.

NARAL campaigned extensively to force Google to remove advertisements for pro-life pregnancy services after complaining that the adverts appeared 79% of the time when users entered the search terms ‘abortion clinics’. Christian Concern

USA: illegal meetings?

Fairfax County, Virginia, has proposed a new law that some believe will outlaw Bible studies held in a home, it was reported in early May.

The law violates the First Amendment right of freedom to assemble in that it states ‘regular gatherings of 50 people or more cannot meet more than three times in 40 days’. One person is concerned that the law is punishing the many for the actions of the few, as noise orders could be given and cars towed away if they violated laws, which is preferable to making a law that stops lawful meetings. Christian Headlines

For more news and prayer fuel from around the world, subscribe to EN for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News from the UK and around the world


Prayer FuelHere are a handful of news-bites from around the UK and around the world included in the May issue of EN. May these encourage us as well as spur us on to pray for our brothers and sisters around the world facing severe persecution.

No church marriages?

Simon Hughes, the Liberal Democrat justice minister, said in early March that the traditional Christian wedding ceremony should no longer have legal status.
Couples who want to marry in church would have to undertake two separate ceremonies (the civil one taking place as part of the church wedding) in order for their marriage to be recognised by the state.
The Daily Telegraph

Marriage types preserved

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has confirmed that it will present figures for opposite-sex and same-sex marriages and divorces separately.
In a public consultation launched in October by the ONS, it was clear from the wording of the questions that the UK’s recognised statistical institute was considering the adoption of a gender-blind approach to marriage and divorce statistics.
Family Education Trust

Burning babies’ bodies

In late March it was reported that stillborn and miscarried babies have been used to provide heat for hospitals, or been incinerated with medical waste.
The Chief Medical Officer has written to hospitals noting that current guidance is clear that this should not be taking place. Over 15,000 human remains have been incinerated over the past two years.
The Christian Institute

India: gospel meetings

On March 18–19, two days of public gospel meetings were held in a village outside the city of Bellary in Karnataka.
There was no opposition from Hindu people and many villagers gathered to watch the singing and dancing performed by Sunday school children. Pastor Rathna Kumar preached the gospel and several people came to know Jesus. Further gospel meetings like this are being planned for the coming months. Please pray that more people are saved through this work.
Gihon Ministry

Palestine: ID changes

The Palestinian Authority has stopped including religious affiliation on national ID cards, meaning that these will no longer differentiate between Muslims and Christians, it was reported in late March.
Explaining the move, the Interior Ministry said that the Palestinian Basic Law prohibits discrimination on the basis of religion or ethnicity. Hamas have criticised the move as they fear it is one step towards allowing Jewish settlers to remain in the future Palestinian state and to be citizens on equal terms with Muslims and Christians.
Barnabas Fund

Ukraine: praying

On March 10 it was reported that despite the tensions, mission groups and churches are reporting an increased interest in faith in the Ukraine.
‘Christians throughout Ukraine are praying and fasting. All churches are overcrowded with people who are coming to seek God’s face and ask for deliverance’, according to Rostislav Borishkevich, director of Good Samaritan Mission in Kiev. ‘People are crying out to God because they know that only he can help our nation.’
Religion Today

For more news and prayer fuel from around the world, subscribe to EN for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News from around the world


Prayer FuelHere are a handful of news-bites from around the world included in the April issue of EN. May these encourage us as well as spur us on to pray for our brothers and sisters around the world facing severe persecution.

Belgium: killing petition
The Bill to allow Belgian children of all ages to access euthanasia is being opposed by people all across Europe, via a petition organised just hours after the Bill was voted through in mid-February.
Although there are concerns that it will produce a constitutional crisis if the Bill isn’t signed by the Belgian monarch, the aim of the petition is to protect the vulnerable.
Christian Concern

The petition to oppose the signing of the Bill can be found at http://www.citizengo.org/en/4158-not-sign-legalisation-child-euthanasia#8203

Mexico: services cut off
On February 11, 25 Protestant families had their water and electricity supplies disconnected and were effectively put under house arrest, because of their refusal to participate in traditionalist Catholic religious ceremonies.
One person was arbitrarily detained by village authorities and imprisoned for more than 24 hours after he attempted to reconnect his water while under the supervision of state officials and police. This follows an escalation of discriminatory behaviour towards the group of Protestant Christians since 2010.
Christian Solidarity Worldwide

Poland: millions seeking
The website ‘Looking for God’ has registered its two millionth unique visitor in February.
‘Unique’ means that even if an individual visits the website several times it only counts as one visitor. The official population of Poland is 38 million and the figure gives some indication of the effectiveness of this medium for reaching people.
Fellowship of European Broadcasters (FEB) 

For more news and prayer fuel from around the world, subscribe to EN for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News in the UK


Prayer FuelHere are a handful of news-bites from around the UK included in the April issue of EN. May these spur us on to pray for our country and issues we all are facing.

Assisted dying
Following a consultation of its members, the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) will remain opposed to proposed changes to the law on assisted suicide, it was reported in February.
77% of the respondents to the consultation were opposed on account of the effects on the vulnerable, the problems implementing changes without coercion to die being possible and the ‘slippery slope’ nature of the proposals leading to no-consent deaths occurring.
Right to Life Charitable Trust

Wales: smacking stays
On February 11 the Welsh Assembly rejected an amendment to criminalise parents smacking their child.
Assembly members voted 39 to 14, with one Assembly member abstaining. However, Deputy Minister Gwenda Thomas said: ‘There will be an opportunity to examine these issues in forthcoming legislation in this Assembly term’. The issue of criminalising smacking is likely to return to the Welsh Assembly before the 2016 election.
The Christian Institute

Sunday football
Northern Ireland’s national football team will be forced to play an international match at home on a Sunday for the first time, for a Euro 2016 qualifier, it was reported at the end of February.
The news has received widespread criticism, with some urging the Irish Football Association to challenge the decision. Previously, countries have decided their own fixture schedules, but not since an electronic selection process was introduced.
The Christian Institute

For more news and prayer fuel from around the UK, subscribe to EN for monthly updates.

Prayer fuel: News from around the world


Here are a handful of news-bites from around the world included in the March issue of EN. May these encourage us as well as spur us on to pray for our brothers and sisters around the world facing severe persecution.

Algeria: church growing
The Algerian church is one of the fastest growing in the Muslim world, it was reported in early February.
More than 100 testimonies have been broadcast through SAT-7 and church services are aired several times a week. The Algerian government gave an official licence to the church in 2011, so it can exist and worship freely. Fellowship of European Broadcasters (FEB) 

France: ‘family-phobia’
More than 100,000 people took to the streets of Paris and Lyon on February 9 to protest against the introduction of same-sex ‘marriage’ and proposals to legalise medical procedures that will allow same-sex couples to have children.
President Francois Hollande, who has suffered near-record low poll ratings, has postponed further social reforms, which demonstrators have described as ‘family-phobic’, until after next month’s municipal elections. Christian Concern

Tanzania: slaughter avoided
More than 100 Muslim extremists on Tanzania’s semi-autonomous island of Zanzibar stormed a church, following an evening worship service, on January 11 and beat a visiting preacher.
The mob, including suspected members of Islamic extremist groups, meant to attack the congregation’s senior pastor, Bishop Daniel Kwilemba, who was not present at the church. The men shouted that they wished to slaughter the bishop. Morning Star News

 

For more news and prayer fuel from around the world, subscribe to EN for monthly updates.